7 ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE TREATMENTS FOR ANIMALS: A SHORT GUIDE FOR CARING FOR YOUR PET NATURALLY

Here is an excellent article on 7 Alternative treatments for caring for your fur kids.

Kenzo had been paralyzed in all four legs for two weeks.

Healthy Kitty

He wasn’t eating, he slept only on his side and he never even tried to get up. Prescription medications had no effect.

His owners were on a mission to find a solution, and that’s when they found Dr. Valérie Trudel’s acupuncture and osteopathy clinic. When Kenzo arrived at the clinic, he seemed to be in pain.

Dr. Trudel’s first instinct was to prepare his owners for the possibility of euthanasia. Obviously, that’s not a reality any pet owner wants to face, so they made up their mind to try everything they could. They knew the journey ahead would be long.

Dr. Trudel performed acupuncture on Kenzo and his owners decided to wait a full 24-hours before making a snap judgement about the results.

Kenzo arrived lying on his side. After the first treatment, he left lying on his stomach. Dr. Trudel saw him again two weeks later; he was walking.

Alternative medicine specialists can recount many stories like this one.

“I want people to know that euthanasia is not the only solution,” explains Dr. Trudel. “When medicine or surgery are not an option, or there is advice against them, it is really worth the effort to try an alternative medicine. There are of course, many animals that are not euthanized because we have otherwise treated them.”

Are you looking for a solution for helping your pet?

Would you like to try the most natural treatments possible but are confused by all the options? This short guide is for you.

Like you, many pet owners have found that traditional medicine is either not enough or too harsh on their pets. Like you, these owners consider their pet like a member of the family, and they will do everything in their power to give them the best care and, in the worst-case scenario, avoid euthanasia.

Animals quickly become part of the family. They fill an essential emotional need; we establish a real relationship with them. They remind us of our connection to nature and bring us back to what is essential.

What can touch your heart more than genuine concern from our dog when you’re feeling sad? What is more heart-warming than a cat nuzzling up to you after you’ve had a long day?

Animals force us to stop and enjoy the moment.

Recent surveys* show that the United States has over 310 million pets of all sorts, most of these being dogs, cats and fish. More than 44% of households own a dog and more than 35% own a cat.

Traditional veterinary medicine has made spectacular advances in the past few years and remains essential to the well-being of our companions. However, this is also the case for the different alternative medicines.

Click the following link if you’d like to read the entire article 7 alternatives to pet care

Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Can Help with Our Mental Health

At some point in life everyone deals with major upheavals or emotional distress. These events can trigger a host of unexpected feelings and behaviors, from depression and panic attacks to major disruptions in sleep and eating. Acupuncture and Oriental medicine can alleviate symptoms associated with mental and emotional health issues by treating the root cause of the problem to help restore balance to the body’s internal environment.

Mental health disorders are medical conditions that can disrupt a person’s thinking, feeling, mood and ability to cope with the daily demands of life or relate well to others. Affecting people of any age, race, religion, or income, mental health issues are more common than you might think. In fact, experts estimate that a significant number of people report symptoms that indicate sufficient qualifying criteria of a mental disorder. Some mental disorders are less severe and can be easily managed with proper treatment. Other mental illnesses are more serious and require more extensive treatment, including major depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and borderline personality disorder.

From an Oriental medicine perspective, mental health disorders can cause a disruption in the flow of vital energy, or Qi, through the body. These energetic imbalances can throw off the immune system or cause pain, sleep disturbances, abnormal digestion, headaches, menstrual irregularities and, over time, more serious illnesses. Acupuncture treatments can correct these imbalances and directly affect the way your body manages your mental health.

Oriental medicine does not recognize any mental disorder as one particular syndrome. Instead, it aims to treat the specific symptoms that are unique to each individual, using a variety of techniques including acupuncture, lifestyle changes, dietary recommendations and exercises to restore imbalances found in the body. Therefore, if 100 patients are treated with acupuncture and Oriental medicine for anxiety, each of those 100 people will receive a unique, customized treatment.

Mental health issues are best managed when health professionals work together to meet the unique needs of each individual. Acupuncture is an excellent addition to any treatment plan as it is used to help the body restore balance, treating the root of the disorder, while also diminishing symptoms.

Acupuncture and Oriental medicine practitioners have the ability to detect energetic changes that occur in the body and relieve symptoms by restoring equilibrium. The physical and emotional symptoms that you are experiencing will help create a clear picture for your practitioner, from which a treatment plan can be created specifically for you.

If you or someone you know struggles with a mental health disorder, or if you would like to know how to optimize your mental health, please call (760) 803-6725 to find out more about how acupuncture and Oriental medicine can be integrated into your mental and emotional wellness plan today!

Relieving Stress with Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine

Unchecked stress is often the cause of illness and deterioration of health. Finding a release valve for your stress can help you stay healthy. Numerous studies have demonstrated the benefits of acupuncture in treating stress, anxiety and lowering blood pressure. Together, acupuncture and Oriental medicine can help achieve the changes you seek as they assist in illness prevention, stress relief, minimizing aches and pains, improving energy and finding balance.

As a normal part of life, stress enables us to get things done. Left unmanaged, however, stress can lead to emotional, psychological, and even physical problems. Stress causes a disruption in the flow of vital energy, or Qi, through the body. This can throw off the immune system and cause new symptoms or aggravate already troublesome health conditions and, over time, more serious illnesses can develop.

Stressful situations that last over a long period of time can create an ongoing low-level stress that puts continual pressure on the nervous system and can cause the overproduction of stress hormones such as cortisol. The extra stress hormones sustained over an extended period of time may wear out the body’s reserves, leading to fatigue, depression, a weakened immune system, and a host of serious physical and psychological ailments.

According to Oriental medicine, stress, frustration and unresolved anger can play an important part in throwing the immune system off and allowing pathogens to affect the body. Through acupuncture, these energy blockages can be addressed. Acupuncture points can help energy flow smoothly and alleviate not only the symptoms of stress and anxiety, but the stress and anxiety itself. Acupuncture improves circulation of blood throughout the body, which oxygenates the tissues and cycles out stress hormones like cortisol and other waste chemicals. The calming nature of acupuncture also decreases heart rate, lowers blood pressure and relaxes the muscles.

In addition to acupuncture, Oriental medicine offers a wide range of tools and techniques that can be integrated into your wellness plan to keep stress in check. These tools include Tui Na, Qi Gong exercises, dietary therapy, meditations and acupressure that you can administer at home. Seasonal acupuncture treatments serve to nurture and nourish your kidney Qi, which can greatly enhance the body’s ability to thrive in times of stress and aid in healing, preventing illness and increasing vitality.

While it isn’t always possible to remove the external forces causing stress, the ability to effectively deal with stress is a choice. Take time for yourself to cultivate the energy you need to handle your stress more skillfully and effectively.

If you or someone you know is experiencing stress or a related disorder, contact us (760) 803-6725 for more information about how acupuncture and Oriental medicine can help you regain peace of mind and stay healthy!

Walking Can Help Alleviate Stress

Taking a brisk walk boosts endorphins, which can reduce stress hormones and alleviate mild depression.

Walking also promotes health and wellness by putting gentle pressure on an acupuncture point on the sole of the foot known as Yongquan (Gushing Spring).

This point is the start of the Kidney meridian which is located at the sole of your foot, between your 2nd and 3rd metatarsal bones. Stimulation of this energizing point can stabilize emotions and promote clarity of the mind, helping you to focus on your goals.

How To Stimulate Yongquan

While Walking:
Let your heel tap the ground gently and feel your weight transfer fully to the ball and toes of your foot. Focus on breathing into your lower abdomen. Keep your shoulders relaxed and allow your arms to swing freely.

By Tapping:
Use your fists to strike your Yongquan about 100 times on each foot.

By Rolling:
Gently roll a tennis ball under your foot while relaxing on the couch.

Managing Osteoporosis

Aging gracefully

Aging gracefully


Osteoporosis is a condition that causes brittle or porous bones due to a reduction in the bone mineral density. Bone is comprised of living tissue, which is constantly dying and renewing itself.

Normally, old bone is cleared away as new growth occurs. However, when new bone cannot be generated, bones become soft and weak. So, should a fall or coughing fit occur, a fracture may arise. In more severe cases, a break can occur without a noticeable event.

Usually the early stages of osteoporosis do not include noticeable signs or symptoms. In later stages, back pain, loss of height, poor posture or easily occurring bone fractures may happen.

Although anyone can develop osteoporosis, it occurs most frequently among post-menopausal white and Asian women.

Other contributors include low calcium intake, prolonged use of corticosteroid drugs, heavy alcohol consumption, smoking and an inactive lifestyle.

A patient suffering from the consequences of brittle and porous bones may be diagnosed by a practitioner of acupuncture and Oriental medicine with a deficiency of yin. Healthy bone depends on a system of blood vessels to deliver nourishment.

Considered a thickened form of body fluids, blood falls under the domain of yin. When yin is in short supply, dryness is the natural result. A disruption or deficiency in the blood supply to the skeletal system may interfere with its ability to properly lubricate and nourish bone.

In addition to receiving acupuncture treatments to help nourish yin, there are some things you can do at home to address your symptoms of osteoporosis, including increasing physical activity and consuming foods high in calcium that support the skeletal system.

An increase physical activity that includes resistance, flexibility and weight-bearing exercises will strengthen muscles, improve stability and balance, help slow mineral loss and improve cardiovascular health.

If you have osteoporosis, work with a therapist to select appropriate exercises for your health. Choosing exercises with slower controlled movements such as Tai Chi or Qi Gong and avoiding high-impact exercises with jerky movements will reduce the risk of fractures.

To learn how acupuncture and Oriental medicine can assist in prevention and provide osteoporosis support, call for a consultation today!

Six Easy Tips for Greater Health and Longevity

Tai Chi
Aging may be inevitable, but your later years can be vibrant and healthy if attention is given to supporting your physical, mental and emotional well-being. These tips are just a few of the ways that you can bring balance into your life. You don’t need to try doing all of them at once. Focus on one or two of them.

Practice Gratitude
Grateful people report higher levels of positive emotions, life satisfaction, vitality, and optimism, and lower levels of depression and stress, according to Robert A. Emmons, a researcher and professor at University of California-Davis who has authored four books on the subject of the psychology of gratitude.

Dr. Emmons states that the disposition toward gratitude appears to enhance pleasant feeling states more than it diminishes unpleasant emotions. Grateful people do not deny or ignore the negative aspects of life, but they have a healthy attitude towards them.

Make Exercise a Priority
People who exercise more are less likely to be stressed and more likely to be satisfied with life, according to Danish researchers. Compared with sedentary people, joggers are 70 percent less likely to have high stress levels and life dissatisfaction.

Qi Gong and Tai Chi are non-impact exercises that focus on repetitive movements with attention to breathing. Tai Chi and Qi Gong use gentle movements and low physical impact, which are ideal for aging bodies.

The benefits of these exercises include a slower heart rate, lowered blood pressure, and drops in adrenaline and cortisol levels. Making these exercises a regular practice can lead to better health and vitality. The Mayo Clinic reported results from two studies on these ancient practices that concluded they can also alleviate chronic pain.

Take a Day of Rest
Take a day of rest per week from your regular schedule to recharge. Rejuvenation for the body and mind is worth its weight in gold and you will be more productive with the rest of your time!

Get Good Sleep Regularly
Your body repairs itself best at night, so allow plenty of time for it to do so. Good sleep patterns follow nature. Morning is bright and the most Yang time of day, indicating activity. Night is the dark period, a time to slow down and enter the Yin phase of the day.

Poor sleep has been linked to high blood pressure, atherosclerosis, heart failure, heart attacks, stroke, diabetes and obesity. Research has shown that getting at least eight hours of sleep is needed for good heart health.

Alleviate and Manage Stress Levels
Stress is a normal part of life, but if left unmanaged, stress can lead to emotional, psychological, and even physical problems, including heart disease, high blood pressure, chest pains or an irregular heartbeat. Numerous studies have demonstrated the substantial benefits of acupuncture in the treatment of stress, anxiety and mental health.

In addition to acupuncture, Oriental medicine offers a whole gamut of tools and techniques that can be integrated into your life to keep stress in check. These tools include Tui Na, Qi Gong exercises, herbal medicine, dietary therapy, meditations and acupressure that you can administer at home.

Address Health Concerns Quickly: Don’t Wait!
Many diseases can be cured easily if they are caught early, but people often put off seeking treatment. They ignore important signals that something is wrong with their body. We all get warnings about our health and well-being, but these warnings are like traffic lights. They tell us what we ought to do, but they cannot make us do it.

Healthy Aging and Living Life with Vitality

Aging with Vitality

Aging with Vitality


“Old age, believe me, is a good and pleasant thing. It is true you are gently shouldered off the stage, but then you are given such a comfortable front stall as spectator.” — Confucius

Could this be the fate of the aging as Confucius decreed? To be able to enjoy the golden years of life implies a life well lived and that a good, if not excellent, standard of health was maintained. Our attitudes towards the elderly and aging, in general, are not always so encouraging. How to live a life with vitality and exuberance, one that can last until the time of death is not a foolish quest, but one that is recognized by acupuncture and Oriental medicine as realistic and completely within reach.

Oriental medicine has a long history of healing and rejuvenation that teaches us a great deal about aging well. Two thousand years ago, ancient Chinese scholars described the stages of aging in the Huang Di Neijing (The Yellow Emperor’s Internal Classic). They remind us that we cannot change our genetics, but we can change how we live to extend and improve the quality of our lives.

Acupuncture and Oriental medicine emphasize prevention over treatment. This makes a great deal of sense because treating an illness that has already damaged the body is much more difficult than preventing the illness from occurring in the first place. It is never too late. You can begin today.

One of the basic tenets of acupuncture and Oriental medicine theory is the belief that all disease results from the imbalance of yin and yang forces. Yin qualities include darkness, quiet, moisture and formlessness. Yang qualities are represented by light, noise, dryness and form. Running is a yang activity, whereas the rest that comes afterwards is a function of yin. Resting allows for the renewal of depleted energy reserves, which, in turn, makes activity possible. This is one way to describe how the dynamic relationship between yin and yang powers our life force.

The challenges of aging also result from this lack of balance between yin and yang energies. This means that some conditions and symptoms of disease associated with advanced aging may be mitigated by bringing these two energies into harmony again. For example, dry eyes and poor vision can be addressed by acupuncture treatments that focus on nurturing yin and increasing yang. Yin fluids will provide lubrication to the eyes, while an increase in yang helps ensure more energy can reach the top of the head to help improve vision.

Whatever your starting point, you can make positive changes to enhance the quality of your life. Supporting the different ways of improving your health and preventing illness, Oriental medicine promotes living a balanced life. A healthy diet, active lifestyle and emotional well-being are the basic components of Oriental medicine that help point you on the path toward a long and quality life.

Are you experiencing a waning in your Qi? Have concerns about conditions associated with aging? Call for an appointment today!

Beef and Mushroom Adobo- Stew for Fall Season Qi Nodes

As we are now entering into autumn; my favorite season. It is the time where we have shorter days, weather changes (yes even here in sunny San Diego), where the leaves change colors and fall off the trees; it is the time of gathering and storing in anticipation of winter. In agrarian societies it is the time of the harvest of grains, roots and tubers (potatoes, beets, carrots), dry fruits in preparation for the upcoming winter. It is the time to slow down and reflect.

According to the 5 element theory the autumn falls under the earth element, who’s organs are the spleen and stomach; they’re function is to digest and process the foods we eat and the drinks that we imbibe. When they are strong, they transform and transport the pure substances from our food and water to where they can be adsorbed by the cells and thereby create qi and blood. The spleen was is also associated with learning and thought process; it’s time is 9:00 – 11:00 am. In Eastern Nutrition’s adherence to the 5 elements and thereby the seasons, it is recommended to incorporate foods and drink that are of the earth element and therefore spleen friendly and easy to digest.

Here is a (fall) recipe for Beef and Mushroom Adobo which is perfect for this beautiful season.

beef and mushroom adobo

beef and mushroom adobo

Beef and Mushroom Adobo- Stew for Fall Season Qi Nodes

Beef stew meat about :2 pounds
Variety of mushrooms : 3 to 8 kinds
Onion (2 or 3 large white or yellow onions)
Ginger about the size of two thumbs cut into thick slices
White & Black Pepper 1-2 teaspoons of each
Black Vinegar which can be found in Asian Markets or Balsamic :Vinegar to taste.
Porter Beer or any dark stout about 6 12oz bottles
Maple sugar or real maple syrup to taste
Soy Sauce to taste
This is a classic four or five taste peasant dish. It is hearty and very simple to make.
Any one of the flavors can be “brought forward” to adjust the action of the dish.
Place all ingredients in a heavy metal pot and bring to a boil uncovered for 30-40 minutes,
Then cover and reduce heat. Let simmer 2-8 hours. Great heated up the next day and served over
Rice or noodles with green onion slices on top. Adjust the taste before serving!

This stew nourishes blood/qi and fluids while enhancing circulation. The ginger and pepper warm the inner and move blood and fluids. The beer and vinegar regulate the Liver/Spleen qi. Soy Sauce tonifies Kidneys and moves fluids. The sugar enhances blood and Spleen. Beef has a neutral nature and tonifies blood/Heart and the mushrooms are a panacea.

Bon Appetite!

copyright Copyright Da Yuan Circle 2005.

Reduce Your Repetitive Stress Injury Risk

carpal-tunnel-syndrome

Entrapped median nerve

Managing repetitive stress injuries often requires some lifestyle changes, and it can take time to work out a strategy that works best for you.

Here are a few minor changes you can implement to minimize stress on your hands and wrists:

Alternate Tasks

Avoid doing the same task for more than a couple of hours at a time and alternate between tasks that use different muscle groups where possible.

Fatigue is a sign that you need to take a break. Take small breaks to gently stretch and bend your hands and wrists and readjust your position.

Reduce Pressure

Many people use more force than needed to perform tasks involving their hands, which can increase pressure and cause irritation.

Be mindful of the speed and amount of pressure used to perform tasks. Ease up, slow down and grip using your palm or whole hand to distribute the load.

If using tools such as riveters or jackhammers for extended periods, take frequent breaks or operate the tool at a speed that causes the least amount of vibration.

Cultivate Good Posture

Incorrect posture can cause your shoulders to roll forward, shortening neck and shoulder muscles and compressing nerves in your neck, which can affect your wrists, hands and fingers.

Shoulders and neck should be relaxed to open the chest and allow your head to float upwards without strain.

When using a keyboard, wrists should be in a relaxed middle position and in a straight line with your forearms at elbow height or slightly lower.

Exercises for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Hand stretch for carpal tunnel

Hand stretch for carpal tunnel

If you are on a computer all day, or if you are engaged in any other repetitious daily activity, consider setting an alarm for every 20 minutes. This will help remind you to change your posture, perform some stretches, or just take a break. Keep your head up and your shoulders relaxed, but not slouched. Maintaining good posture, whether sitting or standing, can help keep symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome at bay. Here are some easy exercises to help relieve pain and other symptoms.

The first exercise is called the prayer stretch. Put the palms of your hand together, press lightly and hold the pose for 30 seconds. Take a break for 10 seconds, then repeat up to four times. In a variation of this pose, you can hold your hands out in front of you as though you were pushing them up against a wall. Hold for 30 seconds, then shake your hands out. Repeat up to four times.

To stretch in the other direction, make your hands into fists and bend your wrist downwards. This can be done for about 30 seconds, and then the wrists should be straightened and the fingers relaxed. Do this up to four times. Another very simple technique is to make a fist, then open it up and fan out your fingers. Do this as many times as feels good.

This last exercise can also help give your neck a good stretch. Take one hand, with the palm side up, and extend it to your side. If using your left hand, then extend it to your left side. With your arm completely extended at the level of your shoulder, with your palm still facing upwards, point your fingertips downwards. You should feel a good stretch throughout the entire length of your arm. To increase this stretch, gently tilt your ear towards the opposite shoulder. If your left hand is extended, then you will tilt your head to the right.

If you are concerned about any symptoms you may have contact us for an appointment today!